Monday

Title: 10 Most Important Changes to the 2018 NFPA 70E

3/11/19
9:30AM - 10:15AM
Presenter: Jim White, Shermco Industries
Description:

T.B.D.

Title: The Use and Condition Assessment of Esters in Electrical Equipment

3/11/19
9:30AM - 10:15AM
Presenter: Nick Perjanik, WEIDMANN Electrical Technology Inc.
Description:

The use of alternative liquids has historically been based on the need to maintain a transformer's K-class less flammable liquid rating and mitigate the level of risk when operating in enclosed or potentially dangerous environments. Today, the increasing use of natural and synthetic esters are also extending the life of equipment, allowing for increased loading and higher operating temperatures, and are offering a more environmentally friendly footprint. The proper handling and processing, retro-filling, and assessment of the liquid's suitability for continued use all vary when compared to that of mineral oil. Additional interpretive approaches are required when assessing dissolved gas analysis (DGA) results and differentiating between normal, abnormal, and potential fault conditions. The unique chemical, physical, and electrical properties of esters requires an understanding of their advantages and limitations for use. This presentation provides an overview of ester liquids and these issues, an update on industry standards for assessing the liquid's condition, and a summary of the key diagnostic tests applicable to natural and synthetic esters.

Title: PRC-005, Can You Pass an Audit?

3/11/19
9:30AM - 10:15AM
Presenter: Bruce Horowitz, American Electrical Testing Co., LLC
Description:

NERC PRC-005's time based testing intervals are well known and in most cases strictly followed. However, if an audit is performed on a site or customer, can they pass it? Testing performed within the prescribed time frame does not make the test a success or "in compliance" with NERC Standards. What are the correct relay settings? Where did this come from? Who reviews and approves the test data to make sure the relays are still in compliance? A relay can have an impact on other PRC standards, such as PRC-006, PRC-010, PRC-019, PRC-023, PRC-024, PRC-025, etc. A change of one setting or value can impact these other PRCs. Just because the relay test report may indicate the relay passed the test, does not mean it is in compliance. All test data needs to be reviewed and compared with the design basis and verified that it has not changed. If so, does it impact compliance? It is critical to have a process and methodology to control and issue the correct settings for use in the testing and that any test results are reviewed and approved against them. Also, if computer based relays are employed, it is crucial that the "as left" settings are reviewed, compared to the original and verified to be correct. The owner is required to ensure that their protective system is in compliance with PRC-005 and all relevant PRC Standards.

Title: Recommended Practices for Applying an Effective Test Protocol to Power Transformers

3/11/19
9:30AM - 10:15AM
Presenter: Charles Sweetser, OMICRON electronics Corp. USA
Description:

The primary goal when performing diagnostic tests on power transformers is to ensure safe operation and accomplish life extension. Often, influences outside of our control compromise the results. Understanding and controlling these influences will increase the effectiveness and ROI of diagnostic testing. We will investigate the best practices regarding test procedure, test preparation, and the analysis of the results.

The following standard electrical field tests will be included in the discussion:

Power Factor; Exciting Current; Turns/Voltage Ratio; Leakage Reactance; DC Winding Resistance; Sweep Frequency Response Analysis (SFRA)

Issues such temperature, test environment, user error, test connections, and lead placement will be investigated for each test. The audience will be provided with an understanding, application, and analysis of these best practices, supported by specially selected case studies validating the value that these diagnostic tests bring to testing, and finally assessing, power transformers.

Title: A Customer’s Perspective: Implementing Commissioning Plans

3/11/19
9:30AM - 10:15AM
Presenter: Randall Sagan, MBUSI
Description:

Converting a commissioning plan into a working test plan requires a thorough understanding of how the system is intended to operate. Simply testing discrete components will not always validate all of the functions involved. Sometimes, inter-device communications and logic programs must also be tested to fully commission a system.

This paper discusses the development of commissioning plans for several projects and how they were implemented by testing agencies. The plans encompassed Owner's Project Requirements (OPR) and Basis of Design (BOD) and were eventually used to develop on-site acceptance and commissioning tests. The communication-assisted protection and control schemes being used increased the level of complexity of the tests performed. By having well-defined plans, commissioning of the equipment was able to be accomplished much more effectively.

Title: Transformer Turns Ratio Test: Some Unknown Facts

3/11/19
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Presenter: Dinesh Chhajer and Daniel Carreno Perez, Megger
Description:

Transformer Turns Ratio (TTR) is one of the most common test performed to assess the condition of a transformer's windings and core. It is performed as part of acceptance and maintenance test procedure to determine any problems due to poor design, assembly, handling, overloading, fault conditions or poor maintenance. The results can be compared against nameplate ratings to determine any possible insulation deterioration, shorted turns or any other winding or core abnormalities.

TTR is such a simple and easy test to perform that often operators take it for granted without fully understanding the principle and basis of the test, such that when measurements are not as expected it becomes a challenge to diagnose the issue and resolve the problem. This paper will focus on some of the unknown facts associated with the TTR test, going over in detail on the effect of applied test voltage, comparison of energizing from primary vs. secondary side, different vector configurations, differences between nameplate ratio, voltage ratio and turns ratio, source of ratio and phase angle errors, comparison between per phase testing and true three phase testing, testing special applications such as zig-zag transformers and voltage regulators, extreme tap ratios being out of tolerance for On Load Tap Changers, and TTR test correlation with other electrical tests. The paper will also provide field test results and case examples to better explain the above-mentioned facts.

Title: VCB and GCB Power Factor Tests – Data Analysis and Troubleshooting

3/11/19
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Presenter: Michael Wolf, Doble Engineering Company
Description:

This presentation will review the analysis of power factor and capacitance results on vacuum circuit breakers (VCBs) and gas circuit breakers (GCBs). After describing the tests, the analysis of the data provided from each test will be described. Finally, troubleshooting steps to ensure quality results will be reviewed to mitigate outside influences, environmental factors, or test hookup errors.

Title: Electrical Safety Program Principles – Do You Have Them in Your ESP?

3/11/19
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Presenter: Terry Becker, Danatec Educational Services Ltd.
Description:

NFPA 70E Article 110.1 and CSA Z462 Clause 4.1.5 require an employer to have an implemented and documented Electrical Safety Program that directs activity appropriate to the risk associated with electrical hazards. Specific content is noted includes identifying the "Principles" on which the ESP is based. Do you have these "Principles" documented in your implemented and documented Electrical Safety Program? A company's Electrical Safety Program should include detailed content aligned with Occupational Health & Safety Management System Standards (OHSMS) such as ANSI Z10 for the USA and CSA Z1000 for Canada. The "Framework" or "Table of Contents" shall include specific content to be a complete OHSMS and align with the requirements of your Company's overall OHSMS.

Have you reviewed the required "Principles" that NFPA 70E and CSA Z462 recommend? Do you have this information in your Electrical Safety Program? Besides these "Principles" do you have associated "Controls" and "Procedures?" This presentation will provide a review of a specific set of "Principles" which you can audit against your Company's Electrical Safety Program.

Title: MV Cable Termination Failure Prevention

3/11/19
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Presenter: William Higinbotham, EA Technology
Description:

Last year at NETA, EA presented a paper that explored cable failures and determined that medium voltage extruded cable terminations are one of the leading points of cable failure. Workmanship issues lead to partial discharge which in turn leads to failure. These failures appear to be on the rise due to the ease of obtaining and installing heat shrink and cold shrink terminations without the proper training. Test companies will find it beneficial to identify and test for these issues before catastrophic failures occur.

This paper reviews the causes of failure and dives into the specific workmanship issues that result in termination and splice failures. Real world examples of workmanship issues will be examined. Proactive steps to detect workmanship issues will be explained and discussed. Spot check survey and full-time monitoring systems for cable termination uses will be described, along with success stories.

Title: Applications in Power & Power Quality Monitoring

3/11/19
10:30AM - 11:15AM
Presenter: Ross Ignall, Dranetz Technologies
Description:

This session will keep you up to date and cover the most recent changes in the power monitoring standards, tools, techniques and applications. Topics discussed will include the major revisions in the IEEE 519-2014 harmonics standard that effect alternative energy and other applications, along with other industry specific standards, monitoring technologies and techniques. Real world, end user applications and case studies will be used as demonstrations that will help you to get the most out of your monitoring applications. This is an interactive session so please share your own experiences and bring your questions!

Title: Utilizing Primary Injection for Transformer Differential Protection Commissioning

3/11/19
11:30AM - 12:15PM
Presenter: Alan Andrew Holt, Premier Power Maintenance Corporation
Description:

NETA companies continually seek to create added value for our customers whose needs and demands are ever changing. The recent increase of transmission substation projects have created many opportunities for providing increased value as well as many opportunities for failure involving intricate systems. Given two knowns:

  1. The transformer is typically the most expensive component of the substation.
  2. One very common protection mis-operation after substation commissioning is failure of the transformer differential protection scheme.

It is imperative we ensure the transformer protection scheme is fully functional.

This presentation will demonstrate the need to go beyond simple individual component commissioning to include entire system functionality tests. The project includes: 1) research of various projects involving primary injection testing of substation transformer differential protection, 2) development of a best practice method, and 3) implementation of the actual plan.

Title: System Critical Bus Duct Systems – Inspection & Maintenance Best Practices for Isophase and Non-Seg Bus Systems

3/11/19
11:30AM - 12:15PM
Presenter: Mohsen Tarassoly and Mitch Pallansch, Electrical Builders, Inc.
Description:

The purpose of this presentation is to educate the audience on best practices that have been identified for analysis, inspection, cleaning, and maintenance of the bus duct systems of the power generation facility. Many plant operations and maintenance managers ignore the bus duct system, forgetting it is a system critical component in the power plant that does not have redundancy AND is connected to expensive plant assets on both ends.

Common statements made before a bus duct failure include "It has no moving parts, what could go wrong with it." Or, "It has run without issue since the plant was built, why do we need to open it up now?" And another common statement; "We inspect the exterior of the bus and do IR scans of the enclosure regularly." Inevitably, plants that operate under any of these philosophies have or will experience a failure of their bus. This presentation will explain why.

The presentation will review numerous case studies from over forty years of field findings from Electrical Builders, Inc. (EBI). Presentation topics will include IEEE industry standards, inspection options (both online and offline), testing requirements, life extension options, current trends in predictive maintenance programs, the ramifications of poorly and/or inadequately maintained bus duct systems, and best practices for bus duct system inspection and maintenance.

Title: Changing the Electrical Safety Culture

3/11/19
11:30AM - 12:15PM
Presenter: Daryld Ray Crow, DRC Consulting Ltd.
Description:

To change the existing electrical safety culture new ideas need to be developed to cause higher performance in electrical safety for all people exposed to electrical hazards. Human performance is based on a combination of knowledge, skills, and learned behaviors. Beliefs can be influenced through observations and interactions with other professionals. The value of quality mentorship carries a high degree of responsibility to ensure proper safety practices are followed.

A fundamental argument in this paper is that culture represents the sum total of what is commonly acceptable without examination. The culture is also driven by everyday observation and experience. In order to change the culture there must be a redefinition of what is acceptable, followed by visible changes that everyone can experience and observe. Management owns culture because it sets what is tolerable and acceptable. Therefore, the future of electrical safety will depend on how well management understands the risk and consequences of electrical work and their responsibility in shaping and owning electrical safety policies and practices.

Key elements addressed in this paper include human performance, technology changes, implementing new ideas to improve safety and how personnel changes within a corporation can affect safety performance.

Title: There is a You in Analytics

3/11/19
11:30AM - 12:15PM
Presenter: Noah Bethel, PdMA Corporation
Description:

With the growth in popularity of Big Data, what does this popularity mean for the data analyst? Will the workload for analysts grow with Big Data, or does Big Data signal the end of the road for the analyst in data analytics? This article will explore the history of big data, how big data is being applied in the industrial market, and discuss best in class considerations for applying big data analytics in plant reliability. This article will put to rest (at least for now) the fear of a world without analysts.

Title: Calibration: Levels of Service and Understanding the Differences

3/11/19
11:30AM - 12:15PM
Presenter: John E. Couturier, Energy Northwest
Description:

Calibration is calibration is calibration...or is it? The function of calibration is to provide a user of test equipment the assurance that the instruments they use to provide quantitative and qualitative measurement results during testing are accurate and precise. The results of a calibration are documented in a certificate to ensure traceability of the measurements. But, tying a measurement result obtained during calibration to an understandable representation in a certificate can often be confusing, and sometimes misleading. Add to the discussion topics like registration (ISO900x), accreditation (ANSI/NCSL Z540, ISO/IEC 17025), full before and after data, measurement uncertainty, test uncertainty ratios, etc., and the process of simply getting your instruments calibrated takes on a whole new meaning, and that meaning is often open to interpretation. This presentation will take on those issues and more. We'll take a look at the various levels of calibration, and what can, and should be expected from each level. Additionally, we'll break down the documentation provided with each level, and how that information can be beneficial to the test equipment user. We will take a pragmatic approach to the discussion based on understanding the needs of the electrical testing industry, and not some overblown, condescending analysis meant to intimidate. Attendees will take away a better understanding of calibration, and the realization that calibration services are not all the same.

Title: Substation Acceptance and Pre-Operational Testing Plan

3/11/19
2:15PM - 3:00PM
Presenter: Kenneth George Peterson, Hampton Tedder Technical Services
Description:

Utilities have the right to verify that the services provided conform to their contractual requirements. A Utility may monitor the performance of the tests and test equipment certification in relation to the work performed as contractually required. The Contractor should develop an approved procedural test description/plan for the assets outlined within a contract or request for proposal. Current accredited National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) traceable calibration certificates for the equipment utilized during test of all assets should be provided upon request. Today, more utilities are turning to contractors to build and commission their substation; as a result, having a detailed commissioning plan can eliminate costly downtime from undiscovered engineering design problems, manufactures defects, and construction wiring errors. Examples of a proper test plan and illustrations of non-conformance to design will be shared with the audience.

Title: Relay Testing for Real World Conditions

3/11/19
2:15PM - 3:00PM
Presenter: John Lane, Doble Engineering Company
Description:

While relay element testing is a good acceptance test that the relay functions as designed, system faults rarely present themselves in such a clean manner. A fault may have inrush current, severe dc offset. The current transformer may not replicate itself accurately due to high fault current or remnant flux. These conditions may cause the relay to misoperate. Comtrade files from actual events captured from event recorders are extremely useful in testing and verifying a relay will operate under a actual conditions. Comtrade files can played back through a relay test set. This is very useful after a misoperation to verify modified relay settings are correct and do not misoperate. These comtrade files can be modified to add harmonics or high dc offset to test different system conditions. We will look at how to use comtrade files to functional test and commission not only a relay but a system.

Title: 10 Most Common Errors in Arc Flash Analysis

3/11/19
2:15PM - 3:00PM
Presenter: Jim Chastain, EasyPower LLC
Description:

In this presentation, Jim Chastain describes how to identify and correct the top 10 errors encountered by electrical engineering professionals during the initial stages of an arc flash study. This is a helpful review for seasoned veterans of study calculations. It is also excellent for anyone who is just starting to conduct studies either in-house or as a consultant. The list of errors includes starting out with the wrong system size, the problems with using infinite utility data, the issues with incorrect working distances, the improper application of the 2-second rule, and many others.

Title: Challenges in Offshore Wind Energy Maintenance

3/11/19
2:15PM - 3:00PM
Presenter: Kevin Alewine, Shermco Industries
Description:

The strength of offshore wind energy has always been in the high availability of favorable winds and the resulting low levelized cost of energy that base load wind generation affords. The downside is that the cost and complexity of construction, operations and maintenance can often present very a high barrier to success. How is the industry overcoming some of those hurtles and what special operations and maintenance issues, including reliability programs, might be useful? This presentation will cover several aspects of this rapidly growing market including challenges for turbine maintenance as well as collector systems, substation maintenance and transmission cables.

Title: The Reconditioning of Vacuum Interrupters is Nearer Than You May Think

3/11/19
3:15PM - 4:00PM
Presenter: Finley Ledbetter, Group CBS, Inc.
Description:

A new, innovative reconditioning process will allow certain vacuum interrupters (VI) to be reconditioned and return to service after they have reached original life limits. If the VI has not out lived its wear limits or its contact structure has seen too much damage, it will likely be suitable for reconditioning. Most VIs have seen little operation or use and need only to be reconditioned to go directly back into service. The real market disruptions start with the reuse of the original type certified vacuum interrupter design. This reconditioning process is completed within three days in our new, state-of-the-art vacuum interrupter reconditioning facility in Denton, Texas or, in some cases, in the field.

In the future, finding ways to keep old vacuum breakers in service will be needed as the original manufacturers lose the capabilities to support these products. Some vacuum circuit breakers have already been in service for forty plus years and there is no replacement for vacuum technology in sight. However, this new process that Group CBS continues to innovate is truly the missing link in medium voltage breaker life extension.

Title: We Need You and You Need Us!

3/11/19
3:15PM - 4:00PM
Presenter: Scott James, Tate and Lyle Inc.
Description:

A presentation dedicated to customer and service provider/vendor working relationship. Over the past 28 years of working in the electrical field as an electrician, supervisor, general manager, owner, and Industrial Electrical Reliability technologists I have come to appreciate this working relationship. We (customer) need you and You (service provider/vendor) need us! The customer needs service providers/vendors to perform certain jobs and tasks that they cannot do or are qualified to do; while the service provider/vendor needs those jobs to stay in business. I have developed an presentation centered around what I consider the main attributes that are essential for this relationship to be beneficial to both parties. In 2012, I was given the task to develop an Electrical Reliability Program at Tate and Lyle's Loudon, TN plant. This included Medium and Low voltage systems as well as instrumentation devices. We have implemented many programs, techniques, and methods at our plant facility. Our plant has experienced increase electrical equipment reliability, up-time, and production since the programs inception. Reliability is more than just a program - It's a culture. Changing the way your team and service providers/vendors views and relates to reliability has been a big culture change at our plant. The presentation will view and discuss four key ingredients to have a successful customer and service provider/vendor relationship. The four key ingredients begin with Vision, empowered by Vigor, maintained by Variety, and sustained by Victories!

Title: Beyond the Knee Point: A Practical Guide to CT Saturation

3/11/19
3:15PM - 4:00PM
Presenter: Brad Heilman, Schweitzer Engineering Laboratories, inc.
Description:

Current transformer (CT) saturation, while a fairly common occurrence in protection systems, is not often clearly understood by protective relay engineers. This paper forgoes the usual physics equations to describe how CTs saturate in a simple and intuitive way. We then describe the CT equivalent circuit and how it results in the familiar CT excitation graph. We explain the differences between saturation due to large symmetrical ac current components and saturation due to smaller, but long-lasting, exponentially decaying dc components in the fault current. We also explain how remanence accumulates in the core of a CT. ANSI ratings of CTs are explained, and we show how to analyze the performance of CTs using simple tools. Finally, we explain how CT saturation can affect the operation of various protection elements and show how to spot and analyze CT saturation in protective relay event reports. Real-world event reports are presented where relay operation was compromised due to incorrect secondary current values from saturated CTs.

Title: Travel Measurement and Analysis of Medium Voltage Vacuum Circuit Breakers

3/11/19
4:15PM - 5:00PM
Presenter: Volney Naranjo and Robert Foster, Megger; Albert Livshitz, CE Power Engineered Services, LLC
Description:

Medium voltage vacuum circuit breakers (MV VCB) have been used for well over 40 years and are subjected to maintenance, overhaul and testing procedures loosely defined by OEMs. Travel measurements and analysis are paramount for the comprehensive evaluation and diagnostic of the MV VCB. It provides the tool to determine parameters such as the stroke, speed, contact pressure (wipe), overtravel, rebound, etc.

Travel measurements on high and medium voltage circuit breakers with tulip and finger/wedge type contacts that have a relatively long contact travel are a well-developed technique and commonly practiced in the field. Different types of transducers are available, their usefulness is proven, and mounting accessories are available from different manufacturers to facilitate their use.
MV VCBs have butt type contacts with a much shorter stroke and a small gap between contacts when open. Any deviation from the required gap and travel parameters affects the reliability of the vacuum interrupters and breaker performance. But, due to the lack of knowledge or information, and difficulties of connecting a transducer, travel measurements are often neglected.

This paper will present the results from testing several MV VCB from various OEMs using different transducers to determine the viability of usage and provide recommendations for the most suitable transducer to achieve the reliable results and best practices. Several mounting options will be tested to show the effects of and convenience of each with the goal to identify the most common transducers and accessories to have in order to test a variety of MV VCBs. This is a continuation of a paper presented during PowerTest2018 by CE/Power - Albert Livshitz

 

Title: TBD

3/11/19
4:15PM - 5:00PM
Presenter: TBD
Description:

TBD

Title: Addressing Noise Sources During Online PD Testing

3/11/19
4:15PM - 5:00PM
Presenter: Timothy Erwin, EA Technology
Description:

Online Partial Discharge testing offers many benefits to a recurring PD maintenance plan. In most cases online testing can provide indications of potential problems that require attention early, allowing a well-planned approach to addressing developing insulation and cable issues before they reach a critical point requiring immediate attention. But there are high noise sources in switchgear that pose challenges to online partial discharge testing and monitoring. Examples of such noise sources are dry type transformers and inverters that both have design characteristics that may produce mechanical resonance in the PD spectrum.

Increased implementation of online PD testing requires a greater understanding of the effects of such noise sources. The "normal" acoustic emissions deemed acceptable in typical applications can provide troublesome to test methods in that they may provide false positives for PD or mask actual PD behind background noise.

The following is a study of how different methods of on line PD detection can be adversely affected and attempt to determine the best methods of PD detection, ultrasonic, UHF and HFCT, when testing is being done around different noise sources minimizing the number of false positives while not compromising the accuracy of being able to detect actual PD.

Title: Validation Testing of Variable Speed AC and DC Drive Semiconductors, DC Filter Capacitors, and Related Devices

3/11/19
4:15PM - 5:00PM
Presenter: Thomas Engel, Al Corcoran, and Kent Wegley, QP Testing, LLC
Description:

Over the past decades, a large number of variable speed AC and DC drives (VSD's) have been installed in commercial and industrial facilities. VSD's uniquely combine power electronic, electro-mechanical and microprocessor technologies to control the speed of motors from fractional to 100MW at voltages ranging from 208 V to 13.8 KV.

Analysis of both new and aging of VSD's has shown that there are reliability improvements to be gained through predictive and preventive maintenance actions.

Methodology
This paper will highlight VSD aging effects as well as approaches to VSD testing that can be applied to the following:
AC & DC Drives
Power Electronic Devices (Diode, SCR, GTO, IGBT, IGCT, Bus Capacitors)
Drive Filters (Input and output)
Operation performance
It will be shown that measures can be undertaken by electrical maintenance staff using standardized tests, running hours and severity of duty to quantify equipment condition and identify corrective and predictive actions.

Results and Implications
Operational Performance and Reliability of the users' complete VSD installed base can be improved by adopting a standardized VSD testing program that includes internal power electronic components, performance benchmarking, and consideration of aging effects.

Title: Importance of Risk Assessment and Risk Control Hierarchy in Electrical Safety Programs: NFPA 70E Topic

8/11/19
3:15PM - 4:00PM
Presenter: Bhanu Srilla, Grace Engineered Products
Description:

Risk reduction is the foundation of a profound electrical safety program. Electrical safety is all about minimizing risks to acceptable levels that protects both workers and employers from devastating effects of electrical shock and arc-flash hazards. Electrical safety is only achieved when the equipment design, safety controls, policies and procedures all come together in harmony when a task is performed by the worker. No piece of equipment, device, or a safety policy by itself can make a system absolute safe. It is imperative that employers thoroughly understand, identify, analyze, and evaluate the risks their workers' are exposed to while performing their tasks and implement robust risk control techniques and procedures in place to protect their workforce.

Recent changes to NFPA 70E, 2018 standard puts more emphasis in risk assessment area by introducing risk control hierarchy to the standards section and further added human factors, such as human error to the risk assessment. This webinar will focus on the basic principles of risk management, hierarchy of risk controls, hazard based and task based risk assessment methods. Additional topics of discussion will include changes to NFPA 70E on risk assessment, guidance and sample job hazard analysis examples with risk quantification calculations in mechanical and electrical lockout/tagout tasks.

Learning objectives:

  1. Understand why risk assessment is critical to electrical safety
  2. Understand six process elements to risk management
  3. How to identify, analyze and evaluate task risks
  4. Understand risk control hierarchy methods such as elimination, substitution, engineering controls, awareness, administrative controls and PPE
  5. Significance of NFPA 70E 2018 changes related to risk assessment and hierarchy of controls